Hebrew Voices #102 – The Scribe’s Toolbox

Nehemia Gordon and Jewish scribe Mordecha Pinchas (Marc Michaels) discussing the methods used to hand write a Torah scroll. The explore the different types of parchment, how a quill is turned into a precise writing implement, and the surprising ingredients in scribal ink. They also explains the ritual observance involved in writing the name of God and how to fix scribal errors.In this episode of Hebrew Voices, The Scribe's Toolbox, a Jewish scribe explains the ancient methods used since the time of Moses to hand write a Torah scroll. We explore the different types of parchment, how a quill is turned into a precise writing implement, and the surprising ingredients in scribal ink. He also explains the ritual observance involved in writing the name of God and how to fix scribal errors. If you have been following my research of thousands of Hebrew manuscripts and have been wondering what exactly goes into writing one, you need to watch this episode!

I look forward to reading your comments!


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The Lost Scrolls of Auschwitz
Hebrew Voices Episodes
Support Team Studies
Nehemia Gordon's Teachings on the Name of God

Show Notes:
Mordechai Pinchas Sofer
Mordechai Pinchas' (Marc Michael) Books
Restoring the Tyburn Megillah - Paperback | PDF
The Torah in the Wardrobe - Paperback | PDF

Verses Mentioned:
Exodus 15:2
Numbers 5:11-31
Leviticus 11:13-19
Deuteronomy 14:11-18
Deuteronomy 31:19
Deuteronomy 25:17–19
Exodus 17:14





6 thoughts on “Hebrew Voices #102 – The Scribe’s Toolbox

  1. This is definately one of my top 20 favorite H.V. There is a Definate,Discernable Momentum at this Point, Nehemia. Mazel tov and todah. Marc thankyou, were so blessed to be invited in and shown this important stuff. I’m honoured.

  2. I loved this, but I’m definitely going to have to watch it again with the captions turned off. It was hilarious (and, of course, quite distracting) to see what the auto-transcription was turning out for the captions. The “software” (sofer), “mommy” (Maimonides), “crystal meth” (Krystal Nacht), and one that starts with a ‘b’ and rhymes with “witch”.

  3. Wow! This stuff is so interesting and so fascinating! I wish the whole concept of being in the proper frame of mind to perform Yehovah’s service was something more people were aware of!
    According to Leviticus 11:18, the swan isn’t a kosher bird, so why is a swan quill allowable for writing a scroll?
    I was wondering if the wife of this gentleman, who is a scribe herself, was the same lady I saw in this documentary called “Soferet”? The lady in the documentary was born and raised in British Columbia, Canada, (not too far from where I grew up!). It was such an amazing story of faith and determination. Because she was a woman, nobody wanted to take her on as a student but she eventually found a scribe in Jerusalem who would.

  4. This brings up the Israelite Kings who had to write the Torah, the valid meaning of kosher and so many other items of interest,
    The joy and reverence in doing this work shines out and the attention to accuracy. I’ve been reading about the Codex Sinaiticus and there is no comparison.

  5. Not overly technical, yet attention-grabbing. Amazing care in preserving the Torah should make us all stare…at His text much more. Also, thanks for the supplemental links.

  6. Nehemia: Just fascinating. So rich in knowledge. I have to go over all of it again and again. I was in Qumran in Israel and I was standing in the room that had been excavated from the sands of time to find a desk with inkwell. The Essene’s transcribed the Dead Sea Scrolls on this desk before they stored them in pots to put in the caves nearby. These are supposed to be in the Israeli Museum which I hadn’t been to. So the Dead Sea Scrolls had to be constructed the same as this man is detailing?

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