Prophet Pearls #25 – Tzav (Jeremiah 7:21-8:3; 9:22-23)

Prophet Pearls - Haftorah TzavIn this week's Prophet Pearls Tzav, Nehemia Gordon and Keith Johnson discuss the Prophets portion covering Jeremiah 7:21-8:3 & 9:22-23. In this portion paralleling the sacrifices in Leviticus, Gordon traipses through millennia to offer explanations for the perplexing statement, “I didn’t command you to bring sacrifices.” So, were sacrifices allowed or commanded? Plan A or plan B? A remedy for idleness or a method for learning principles? Continue reading

Torah Pearls #24 – Vayikra (Leviticus 1:1-5:26)

Torah Pearls Vayikra, Leviticus 1:1-5:26, bull, burnt, dove, goat, offering, pidgeon, sacrifice, sacrifices, sheep, sin-offering, sino ffering, bloodIn this episode of The Original Torah Pearls, Vayikra (Leviticus 1:1-5:26), we share our recommendations of English translations and how to use them responsibly. What is really going when we see Leviticus chapter 5 ending with verse 19 in the gentile translations, while in the Hebrew and Jewish translations it ends with verse 26. We review the five primary types of sacrifices, which correspond to the first five chapters of the book Leviticus. We discuss whether there is atonement and forgiveness without blood. What “to lean his hand” means.  Whether if you sin can you just bring a sacrifice and receive atonement. What fats we are and aren’t we allowed to eat. The difference between intentional and unintentional sin. If one becomes unclean, have they done something which makes them guilty? Are we really expected to ring the neck of the bird? And so much more. Let me know in the comments what your favorite pearls in this Torah portion are. Continue reading

Prophet Pearls #7 – Vayeitzei (Hosea 12:12-14:9)

Prophet Pearls VayeitzeiThis week Nehemia Gordon and Keith Johnson discuss the Prophets portion for Vayeitzei, covering Hosea 12:12-14:9. With the ear of the fluent, Gordon informs us of the unique structures and forms of Hebrew used in the northern kingdom, and by its only prophet whose book has survived—Hosea. We learn of Hosea’s penchant for transient imagery, his “Jewish mother” tendencies, and his eight-step prayer. Word studies include: “the shepherd,” “the Leviathan,” “Ephraim,” “sheol,” “moshia,” “kissing calves,” “heal,” and the faulty connection between “bulls” and “fruit.” We also learn that while God prefers mercy over sacrifice, there is one thing for which he shows none. Continue reading